Log in
E-mail
Password
Remember
Forgot password ?
Become a member for free
Sign up
Sign up
New member
Sign up for FREE
New customer
Discover our services
Settings
Settings
Dynamic quotes 
OFFON

MarketScreener Homepage  >  News  >  Economy & Forex  >  All News

News : Economy & Forex
Latest NewsCompaniesMarketsEconomy & ForexCommoditiesInterest RatesBusiness LeadersFinance ProfessionalsCalendarSectors 
All NewsEconomyCurrencies / ForexCryptocurrenciesEconomic EventsPress releases

Irish consumer sentiment slumps as no-deal Brexit looms

share with twitter share with LinkedIn share with facebook
share via e-mail
0
10/06/2019 | 07:12pm EDT
Cranes are seen along the skyline in the Irish Financial Services Centre in Dublin

DUBLIN, (Reuters) - Irish consumer sentiment weakened for the third month in a row in September as the failure of the UK and the European Union to agree divorce terms ahead of the Oct. 31 Brexit date increased worries about the outlook for the Irish economy.

Ireland is considered the EU country with most to lose from Brexit, although after growing faster than any other in the bloc every year since 2014 and with record-high employment, its economy is in good shape ahead of potential disruptions. Consumer confidence has taken a hit as the negotiations meander towards a no-deal British exit, however, and the KBC Bank consumer sentiment index sank to 75.3 in September from 77.2 in August -- the lowest level in almost six years. The last time the KBC sentiment index was lower was in November 2013, when the index stood at 71. KBC Bank Ireland chief economist Austin Hughes said the survey paints a picture of anxious Irish consumers who could be further unsettled if the upcoming budget creates a sense of panic about the possibility of tougher times to come.

"Four of the five main components of the KBC Irish consumer sentiment were lower in September than in August," he said. Hughes said the only element to improve was consumers' assessment of the buying climate which rose marginally. He believes this reflects broadly positive employment dynamics and wage growth in the Irish economy.

(Reporting by Graham Fahy; Editing by Catherine Evans)

share with twitter share with LinkedIn share with facebook
share via e-mail
0
Latest news "Economy & Forex"
07:22pCENTRAL PEOPLE GOVERNMENT OF PEOPLE RE : China's grain reserves sufficient for market supply, emergency response
PU
07:19pUAW calls Thursday meeting to update union leaders on GM strike talks - sources
RE
07:12pEXCLUSIVE : No choice but to invest in oil, Shell CEO says
RE
07:01pEurope's Most Trusted Crypto And Precious Metal Companies Partner To Create Gold Token Secured By Bitcoin Network
PR
06:44pScrambling to limit damage, Trump tells Turkey to stop its Syria invasion
RE
06:42pSouthwest pilots say 737 MAX return may be delayed beyond Boeing's fourth quarter goal
RE
06:40pGoogle's fight against EU antitrust fine to be heard February 12-14 at EU court
RE
06:39pHouse panel 'strongly' urges Uber, Lyft to take part in hearing
RE
06:30pC Diff Foundation Raises Clostridioides difficile Awareness in St. Louis on Nov. 6-7 at 7th Annual International Conference and Health EXPO
SE
06:22pAMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR : 2019 Sugarbeet Crop Harvest Update
PU
Latest news "Economy & Forex"