Log in
Log in
Or log in with
GoogleGoogle
Twitter Twitter
Facebook Facebook
Apple Apple     
Sign up
Or log in with
GoogleGoogle
Twitter Twitter
Facebook Facebook
Apple Apple     
News
All NewsCompaniesIndexesCurrency / ForexCommoditiesCryptocurrenciesETFInterest RatesEconomyThemesSectors 

China JD.com founder Liu settles U.S. rape civil suit

10/02/2022 | 03:31am EST
China International Fair for Trade in Services (CIFTIS) in Beijing

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Billionaire Richard Liu, founder of one of China's largest e-commerce platforms JD.com, has settled a civil suit brought by former University of Michigan student Liu Jingyao, who had accused him of rape.

The suit was part of a long-running legal battle between Richard Liu and Liu Jingyao, who was a 21-year-old student in 2018 when she said Richard Liu raped her after an evening of dinner and drinks.

A statement from the lawsuit's parties, and provided to Reuters by JD.com, said: "The incident between Ms. Jingyao Liu and Mr. Richard Liu in Minnesota in 2018 resulted in a misunderstanding that has consumed substantial public attention and brought profound suffering to the parties and their families."

It went on to confirm that the case, which last week began jury selection proceedings in a Minnesota court, has been settled, but did not disclose the conditions of the settlement.

JD.com declined to comment further on the case, while lawyers for Richard Liu and Liu Jingyao did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Richard Liu is a high-profile billionaire in China who founded and until earlier this year was chief executive of JD.com. He handed the CEO reins to Xu Lei in April.

Liu Jingyao filed the civil suit in April 2019, four months after prosecutors declined to press criminal charges against Richard Liu.

The case heavily dented Liu's reputation in China and put scrutiny on his control of the e-commerce giant. In 2019, he resigned from the advisory body to China's parliament, citing "personal reasons".

The case had also galvanised many women in China, where issues such as sexual harassment and assault had for years been rarely broached in public until the #MeToo movement took root in 2018, though it has faced online censorship and official pushback since.

Supporters of Liu Jingyao on Chinese social media called the settlement a win for China's #MeToo movement.

News of the settlement quickly began trending on Chinese social media on Sunday, with more than 110 million people reading news on the topic.

(Reporting by Casey Hall and Winni Zhou; Editing by Kim Coghill)

By Casey Hall


ę Reuters 2022
Stocks mentioned in the article
ChangeLast1st jan.
JD LOGISTICS, INC. 0.12% 16.26 Delayed Quote.-38.53%
JD.COM, INC. -3.40% 58.32 Delayed Quote.-16.77%
Latest news "Economy"
02:36aLeonardo Says It Has Signed A Loan Agreement For 260 Million Euros With European Investment Bank
RE
02:30aKansas oil spill leaked 14,000 barrels - official
RE
02:23aTurkish watchdog cuts banks' forex to capital ratio limit
RE
02:06aNobel awards to take place in Stockholm with full glitz and glamour
RE
01:46aAustralia seeks to limit gas producers' profits as prices soar
RE
01:16aTaiwan mulls WTO case after latest Chinese import bans
RE
01:07aHow daredevil drones find nearly extinct plants hiding in cliffs
RE
12:45aTaiwan central bank will adopt 'appropriate' monetary policy next year
RE
12/09China to allow German expats to use German COVID-19 vaccines
RE
12/09China cracks down on drug price gouging amid fears of COVID spike
RE
Latest news "Economy"