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Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January – June 2021pdf icon

11/16/2021 | 12:26am EST

N ATIONAL CENTER FOR HEA LTH STATISTICS

National Health Interview Survey Early Release Program

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the

National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2021

by Robin A. Cohen, Ph.D., Michael E. Martinez, M.P.H., M.H.S.A., Amy E. Cha, Ph.D., M.P.H., and Emily P. Terlizzi, M.P.H.

Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics

What's New

  • Estimates of health insurance coverage based on data from January through June 2021 are provided, along with selected trends in coverage from 2019 through the first 6 months of 2021.

Highlights

  • From January through June 2021, 31.1 million people of all ages (9.6%) were uninsured at the time of interview. This was not significantly different from 2020, when 31.6 million people of all ages (9.7%) were uninsured.
  • From January through June 2021, among adults aged 18-64, 14.0% were uninsured at the time of interview, 21.6% had public coverage, and 66.3% had private health insurance coverage.
  • Among children aged 0-17 years, 4.4% were uninsured, 44.7% had public coverage, and 53.1% had private health insurance coverage.
  • Among adults aged 18-64, Hispanic adults (31.4%) were more likely than non-Hispanic Black (14.7%), non-Hispanic White (9.0%), and non-Hispanic Asian (6.1%) adults to be uninsured.
  • The percentage of people under age 65 with exchange-based coverage increased from 3.7% in 2019 to 4.3% in the first 6 months of 2021.

This report presents estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the January through June 2021 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). These estimates are being published before final editing and final weighting to provide access to the most recent information from NHIS. Estimates are disaggregated by age group, sex, family income (as a percentage of the federal poverty level [FPL]), race and ethnicity, and state Medicaid expansion status. Detailed appendix tables contain all estimates presented in the figures and additional estimates for selected population characteristics. With 3 years of comparable data available starting with the redesigned NHIS in 2019, this report is now able to provide data on trends, similar to reports using 2018 and earlier data. Quarterly estimates by age group and family income, and more information about NHIS and the Early Release (ER) Program, are available from the NHIS website.

Figure 1. Percentage of people who were uninsured or had public or private coverage, by age group: United States, January-June 2021

NOTES: People were defined as uninsured if they did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), state-sponsored or other government plan, or military plan. People were also defined as uninsured if they had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. Public coverage includes Medicaid, CHIP, state-sponsored or other government-sponsored health plan, Medicare, and military plans. Private coverage includes any comprehensive private insurance plan (including health maintenance and preferred provider organizations). These plans include those obtained through an employer, purchased directly, purchased through local or community programs, or purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace or a state-based exchange. Private coverage excludes plans that pay for only one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. A small number of people were covered by both public and private plans and were included in both categories. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2021.

  • From January through June 2021, among people of all ages, 9.6% were uninsured, 39.5% had public coverage, and 60.1% had private coverage at the time of interview (Figure 1).
  • Adults aged 18-64 were the most likely to be uninsured (14.0%), followed by children aged 0-17 years (4.4%) and adults aged 65 and over (0.6%).

P a g e | 1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ● Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ● National Center for Health Statistics ● Released 11/2021

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2021

  • Adults aged 65 and over were the most likely to have public coverage (96.0%), followed by children aged 0-17 years (44.7%) and adults aged 18-64 (21.6%).
  • Adults aged 18-64 were the most likely to have private coverage (66.3%), followed by children aged 0-17 years (53.1%) and adults aged 65 and over (47.4%).

Figure 2. Percentage of adults aged 18-64 who were uninsured or had public or private coverage, by year: United States, 2019-June 2021

NOTES: People were defined as uninsured if they did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), state-sponsored or other government plan, or military plan. People were also defined as uninsured if they had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. Public coverage includes Medicaid, CHIP, state-sponsored or other government-sponsored health plan, Medicare, and military plans. Private coverage includes any comprehensive private insurance plan (including health maintenance and preferred provider organizations). These plans include those obtained through an employer, purchased directly, purchased through local or community programs, or purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace or a state-based exchange. Private coverage excludes plans that pay for only one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. A small number of people were covered by both public and private plans and were included in both categories. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data collection switched to a telephone-only mode beginning on March 19, 2020. Personal visits (with telephone attempts first) resumed in all areas in September 2020. In addition, from August- December 2020, a subsample of adult respondents who completed NHIS in 2019 were recontacted by telephone and asked to participate again. Response rates were lower and respondent characteristics were different in April-December 2020. Differences observed in estimates between April-December 2020 and other time periods may have been impacted by these differences in respondent characteristics. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019-2021.

  • Among adults aged 18-64, the percentage who were uninsured did not change significantly between 2020 (13.9%) and January through June 2021 (14.0%) (Figure 2).
  • Among adults aged 18-64, the percentage who had public coverage from January through June 2021 (21.6%) was higher than, but not significantly different from, the percentage who had public coverage in 2020 (20.5%).
  • Among adults aged 18-64, the percentage who had private coverage from January through June 2021 (66.3%) was lower than, but not significantly different from, the percentage who had private coverage in 2020 (67.5%).
  • Among adults aged 18-64, the percentage with public coverage increased from 2019 (20.4%) through the first 6 months of 2021 (21.6%); the observed decrease among adults aged 18-64 who were uninsured between 2019 and the first 6 months of 2021 was not significant, and no significant pattern of private coverage was seen.

P a g e | 2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ● Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ● National Center for Health Statistics ● Released 11/2021

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2021

Figure 3. Percentage of children aged 0-17 who were uninsured or had public or private coverage, by year: United States, 2019-June 2021

NOTES: People were defined as uninsured if they did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), state-sponsored or other government plan, or military plan. People were also defined as uninsured if they had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. Public coverage includes Medicaid, CHIP, state-sponsored or other government-sponsored health plan, Medicare, and military plans. Private coverage includes any comprehensive private insurance plan (including health maintenance and preferred provider organizations). These plans include those obtained through an employer, purchased directly, purchased through local or community programs, or purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace or a state-based exchange. Private coverage excludes plans that pay for only one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. A small number of people were covered by both public and private plans and were included in both categories. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data collection switched to a telephone-only mode beginning on March 19, 2020. Personal visits (with telephone attempts first) resumed in all areas in September 2020. In addition, from August- December 2020, a subsample of adult respondents who completed NHIS in 2019 were recontacted by telephone and asked to participate again. Response rates were lower and respondent characteristics were different in April-December 2020. Differences observed in estimates between April-December 2020 and other time periods may have been impacted by these differences in respondent characteristics. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019-2021.

  • Among children aged 0-17, the percentage who were uninsured from January through June 2021 (4.4%) was lower than, but not significantly different from, the percentage who were uninsured in 2020 (5.1%) (Figure 3).
  • Among children aged 0-17, the percentage who had public coverage from January through June 2021 (44.7%) was higher than, but not significantly different from, the percentage who had public coverage in 2020 (42.2%).
  • Among children aged 0-17, the percentage who had private coverage from January through June 2021 (53.1%) was lower than, but not significantly different from, the percentage who had private coverage in 2020 (54.9%).
  • Among children aged 0-17, the percentage with public coverage increased from 2019 (41.4%) through the first 6 months of 2021 (44.7%); the observed decreases among children aged 0-17 who were uninsured or with private coverage between 2019 and the first 6 months of 2021 were not significant.

P a g e | 3 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ● Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ● National Center for Health Statistics ● Released 11/2021

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2021

Figure 4. Percentage of adults aged 18-64 who were uninsured, by family income as a percentage of the federal poverty level and year: United States, 2019-June 2021

NOTES: FPL is federal poverty level. People were defined as uninsured if they did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), state-sponsored or other government plan, or military plan. People were also defined as uninsured if they had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data collection switched to a telephone-only mode beginning on March 19, 2020. Personal visits (with telephone attempts first) resumed in all areas in September 2020. In addition, from August-December 2020, a subsample of adult respondents who completed NHIS in 2019 were recontacted by telephone and asked to participate again. Response rates were lower and respondent characteristics were different in April-December 2020. Differences observed in estimates between April-December 2020 and other time periods may have been impacted by these differences in respondent characteristics. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019-2021.

  • From January through June 2021 among adults aged 18-64, the percentage who were uninsured was highest among those with family incomes less than 100% FPL (26.9%), followed by those with family incomes from 100% to less than 200% FPL (23.8%) and those with family incomes at or above 200% FPL (8.6%) (Figure 4).
  • No significant differences were observed in the percentage of uninsured between 2020 and the first 6 months of 2021 for any of the family income subgroups shown.
  • Among adults aged 18-64 with family incomes from 100% to less than 200% FPL, the percentage who were uninsured decreased from 2019 through the first 6 months of 2021; the observed trends in the percentage of uninsured adults aged 18-64 with family incomes of less than 100% FPL or family incomes of 200% and greater FPL, between 2019 and the first 6 months of 2021 were not significant.

P a g e | 4 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ● Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ● National Center for Health Statistics ● Released 11/2021

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2021

Figure 5. Percentage of children aged 0-17 who were uninsured, by family income as a percentage of the federal poverty level and year: United States, 2019-June 2021

NOTES: FPL is federal poverty level. People were defined as uninsured if they did not have any private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), state-sponsored or other government plan, or military plan. People were also defined as uninsured if they had only Indian Health Service coverage or had only a private plan that paid for one type of service, such as accidents or dental care. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data collection switched to a telephone-only mode beginning on March 19, 2020. Personal visits (with telephone attempts first) resumed in all areas in September 2020. In addition, from August-December 2020, a subsample of adult respondents who completed NHIS in 2019 were recontacted by telephone and asked to participate again. Response rates were lower and respondent characteristics were different in April-December 2020. Differences observed in estimates between April-December 2020 and other time periods may have been impacted by these differences in respondent characteristics. Data are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019-2021.

  • From January through June 2021 among children aged 0-17, the percentage who were uninsured was higher among those with family incomes less than 100% FPL (6.9%) and from 100% to less than 200% FPL (6.2%) compared with those with family incomes 200% and greater FPL (2.9%) (Figure 5).
  • No significant differences were observed in the percentage of uninsured between 2020 and the first 6 months of 2021 for any of the family income subgroups shown.
  • Among children aged 0-17, the percentage who were uninsured decreased among those with family incomes 200% and greater FPL, from 4.3% in 2019 to 2.9% in the first 6 months of 2021; the observed increase in the percentage of uninsured children with family incomes less than 100% FPL, from 2019 to the first 6 months of 2021 was not significant. Among children with family incomes from 100% to less than 200% FPL, no trends were observed.

P a g e | 5 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ● Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ● National Center for Health Statistics ● Released 11/2021

This is an excerpt of the original content. To continue reading it, access the original document here.

Disclaimer

NCHS - U.S. National Center for Health Statistics published this content on 16 November 2021 and is solely responsible for the information contained therein. Distributed by Public, unedited and unaltered, on 16 November 2021 05:25:04 UTC.


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