Log in
E-mail
Password
Show password
Remember
Forgot password ?
Become a member for free
Sign up
Sign up
New member
Sign up for FREE
New customer
Discover our services
Settings
Settings
Dynamic quotes 
OFFON
News: Latest News
Latest NewsCompaniesMarketsEconomy & ForexCommoditiesInterest RatesBusiness LeadersFinance Pro.CalendarSectors 
All NewsEconomyCurrencies & ForexEconomic EventsCryptocurrenciesCybersecurityPress Releases

Ivory Coast's cocoa mid-crop needs more rain for strong finish

08/02/2021 | 08:11am EDT

ABIDJAN, Aug 2 (Reuters) - Cocoa farmers in top grower Ivory Coast said on Monday that additional moisture would be needed for the April-to-September mid-crop to reach its maximum potential, following a week of lacklustre rainfall.

The West African nation is in its rainy season which runs from April to mid-November. Downpours are typically frequent and heavy over that period.

Most farmers surveyed by Reuters said that small pods were developing well despite the recent dry spell, and that the first beans should be available for harvest by next month.

Other farmers said more rains were needed to improve bean quality and ensure that the mid-crop finishes strongly. Good rainfall over the coming weeks would also get the October-to-March main crop off to a healthy start, they said.

"It hasn't rained enough to have a lot of cocoa during the first three months of the main crop," said Marc Aka, who farms near Daloa, where rainfall was 0.8 millimetres (mm) below the regional five-year average at 22.6 mm.

Rains also fell below five-year averages last week in the central regions of Bongouanou and Yamoussoukro.

In the western region of Soubre and in the southern region of Divo, where rainfall was above average last week, farmers expressed confidence in the season's cocoa outlook.

Weather conditions through late September will be crucial in determining whether the main crop will improve over the previous season, they said.

"We have a lot of big pods on the trees. Pickings will start slowly in September and increase in October," said Kouassi Kouame, who farms near Soubre, where rainfall was 12.8 mm above average at 29.7 mm.

Although rains were below the average in the southern region of Agboville and in the eastern region of Abengourou, farmers there also reported positive growing conditions and expect harvesting to begin soon.

The average temperature in Ivory Coast last week ranged from 24.8 to 26.9 degrees Celsius. (Reporting by Loucoumane Coulibaly; Editing by Cooper Inveen and David Evans)


© Reuters 2021
Latest news "Economy & Forex"
03:46pAmid COVID surge, states that cut benefits still see no hiring boost
RE
03:35pBiden admin looks to revive Trump-era order on migrant expulsion
RE
03:32pFDA advisers vote to oppose Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine booster
RE
03:32pU.s. fda advisers may vote on potential narrower recommendation of pfizer covid-19 booster doses after rejecting boosters in those 16 and up
RE
03:32pCBA CONSUMER BANKERS ASSOCIATION : ABA Lead Coalition Opposing New IRS Reporting Regime
PU
03:32pFda advisory committee votes overwhelmingly no to boosters for everyone - nyt reporter tweet
RE
03:31pU.s. fda advisers vote against approving booster dose of pfizer/biontech covid-19 vaccine for people aged 16 and older
RE
03:31pShares fall on fears over China, U.S. taxes, central bank policy
RE
03:30pU.S. banking lobby groups oppose proposed tax reporting law
RE
03:26pU.s. fda official says its advisory committee could propose modified voting question if it votes against pfizer's covid-19 booster vaccine application
RE
Latest news "Economy & Forex"